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What kind of groats are the healthiest?

In short

The healthiest of groats is quinoa - contains high quality proteins and fats (including mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids beneficial for health). In it we can find a lot of vitamins (including B1, B2, B4), a lot of phosphorus and magnesium.

Amaranth is the second in terms of richness of nutrients - we will find similar amounts of macro- and micronutrients as in quinoa. What's more, it abounds with oils that have a positive effect on the heart and cholesterol levels.

The healthiest groats,traditionally present in Poland are the millet groats, which greatly affect immunity and circulatory system. It’s worth reaching for them, because they contain a lot of B vitamins, phosphorus, zinc and magnesium as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Buckwheat is equally valuable - thanks to the high content of vitamin B5 and B6 it strengthens the immune system. We can also find vitamin K in it that has anti-inflammatory and antifungal properties.

It’s also worth reaching for barley, as it's a great source of vitamin B3 as well as iron, zinc and potassium.

For children, elderly people, convalescents, especially semolina and corn are recommended - although they contain the least nutritional values, they are very easily digestible.

In detail

Quinoa

It improves the functioning of the circulatory system, has a positive effect on bone growth and development.

It contains valuable riboflavin, thanks to which it affects not only our immunity, but also the condition of the skin, hair and nails.

Out of all groats, it contains the most valuable exogenous amino acids that the body cannot produce itself.

Quinoa from all groats contain the most mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are beneficial for health, because they allow our body to reduce the level of "bad cholesterol" LDL and triglycerides, and increase the level of "good cholesterol" HDL.

Quinoa contains the most monounsaturated fatty acids - 0.528 g / 100 g.

Quinoa also contains the most polyunsaturated fatty acids, as much as over 1 gram per 100 grams of cooked groats. Millet contains only half the amount of these acids - 0.5 g / 100 g, and buckwheat and barley - five times less, about 0.2 g / 100 g.

It has proteins of high nutritional value, containing exogenous amino acids (including lysine, methionine, tryptophan).

Exogenous amino acids are essential amino acids that the body cannot synthesize alone and so they must be supplied in food.

Exogenous amino acids include 10 amino acids, of which two (arginine and histidine) are considered to be relatively exogenous, that is, they are produced in quantities sufficient for an adult human, but not for the developing organism. Other exogenous amino acids are: phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, valine.

It’s a great source of vitamin B1 (thiamine) - 0.107 mg / 100 g.

This amount represents approximately 10% of the daily requirement for vitamin B1, which is 1.3 mg for men and 1.1 mg for women.

It also abounds in vitamin B2 - it contains 0.11 mg / 100 g.

The daily requirement for riboflavin is estimated at 1.3 mg for men and 1.1 mg for women.

Vitamin B2 affects the proper functioning of the immune system, improves the condition of the skin, hair and nails, and strengthens the eyesight.

The most vitamin B4 (choline) is found in the quinoa - 23 mg / 100 g.

However, these are small amounts, because the recommended daily intake of vitamin B4 is 550 mg for men and 425 mg for women.

It provides the body with large amounts of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) - 0,123 mg / 100 mg. The estimated daily requirement for this vitamin is 1.3 mg.

Vitamin B6 facilitates the absorption of protein, affects the production of hemoglobin, soothes muscle cramps and strengthens the body's immune system.

It contains folate (vitamin B9) - 42 μg / 100 mg, which is 10% of the daily requirement for these compounds.

Folate is a group of compounds that includes folic acid and its derivatives. In the human body they are necessary for the synthesis of DNA, the functioning of the hematopoietic and nervous systems and they play an important role in the metabolism of homocysteine.

Vitamin E is a group of compounds called tocopherols.

Tocopherols are very powerful antioxidants - they protect against oxidative stress and cell damage by free radicals.

Of the four tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma and delta), tocopherol alpha is the most active - quinoa contains the most of this tocopherol (out of all groats) - 0.63 mg / 100 g.

The estimated daily requirement for this vitamin is 10 mg for men and 8 mg for women.

Quinoa also contains other types of tocopherols: beta - 0.03 mg, gamma - 1.19 mg, delta - 0.11 mg per 100 g of cooked porridge.

Nutritional values ​​in 100 grams of quinoa after cooking:

  • 120 kcal;
  • 4.4 g of protein - these are proteins of high nutritional value, containing exogenous amino acids;
  • 0.9 g of sugar;
  • 1.92 g fat;
  • 21.3 g carbohydrates.

Gluten-free.

It’s a very good source of phosphorus - it contains about 150 mg / 100 g (daily requirement is 700 mg).

Phosphorus participates in the mineralization of bones and teeth. It’s necessary for the construction of soft tissues and cell membranes. It plays an important role in the transmission of nerve impulses. It takes part in energy transformations and helps in maintaining acid-base balance.

Quinoa contains a lot of copper. In 100 g of these groats we can find 0.19 mg of this element, which is 21% of the daily requirement, which is 0.9 mg.

Copper is essential in the body for the proper functioning of the nervous system. It’s also a component of many enzymes involved in oxygen transformation.

Quinoa contains a lot of iron - 1.5 mg per 100 g, which is 15% of the daily requirement for this element in men and 8% of daily demand in women.

Iron plays a very important role in tissue respiration processes and in the formation of red blood cells in the bone marrow.

Quinoa also contains a lot of manganese - 0.63 mg per 100g, which covers 27% of the daily requirement for this element in men and 35% in women.

Manganese supports the digestive, nervous and bone systems.

Quinoa contains about 65 mg of magnesium per 100 g of cooked porridge.

Groats are not the best source of potassium. The most of this element is found in quinoa - 172 mg per 100 g, which is about 3.5% of the recommended daily requirement, which is estimated at 4700 mg.

Amaranth

Thanks to the content of many oils (including linoleic, oleic) it supports the work of the heart, reduces the risk of anemia and atherosclerosis.

It’s also worth mentioning its beneficial effects on cholesterol - it lowers its level and raises HDL concentration.

We find in it a wealth of oils (including linoleic, oleic), which have a positive effect on the heart and cholesterol (lowering its level and raises the concentration of HDL), prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis and anemia.

Squalene, one of the oils of amaranth, also works on the skin - it inhibits the aging of the body and accelerates wound healing.

The three main fatty acids that make up more than 90% of the amaranth oils are: linoleic oil (44%), oleic acid (29%) and palmitic acid (22%).

Linoleic oil is the most important polyunsaturated fatty acid, which in the largest amounts is found in sunflower oil and soy. Consumption of linoleic acid reduces the risk of heart and circulatory diseases. Loss of linoleic acid can lead to hair loss, flaking of the skin and impeding wound healing.

Oleic acid is the most important monounsaturated fatty acid. it's found in the largest quantities in olive oil, nuts and rapeseed oil. It probably reduces the risk of heart and circulatory diseases. It lowers the level of "bad cholesterol" (LDL) and lowers blood pressure.

Palmitic acid is a fatty acid present commonly found in plants and animals. In the largest amounts occurs in the palm tree. It’s bad for health - it increases the level of total cholesterol and the LDL "bad cholesterol" fraction.

Squalene

Squalene is the oil originally obtained from shark liver. Currently, it’s also obtained from plants (olives, amaranths, wheat germs) and genetically modified yeast that synthesize squalene from sugars.

In amaranth, the amount of squalene ranges from traces to over 7% of all oils, and the average concentration level is around 4%. Squalene is mainly found in seeds, there are traces in the leaves.

Squalene contained in amaranth is stable at high temperature and retains its antioxidant properties.

It's the main component of polyunsaturated lipids found on the surface of the skin. It has softening, antioxidant, moisturizing and anti-cancer properties.

Compared to other groats, it contains relatively much tocopherols (vitamin E), (much more than the remaining groats, with the exception of quinoa).

In 100 grams of cooked amaranth, you can find: 0.19 mg of tocopherol alpha, 0.38 mg of beta, 0.05 mg of gamma and 0.24 mg of delta.

Vitamin E is a very powerful antioxidant, protects against oxidative stress and cell damage by free radicals.

It's a good source of folates (vitamin B9) - in amaranth there are about 20 g of folate for 100 g of cooked porridge.

Folate is a group of compounds that includes folic acid and its derivatives. In the human body they are necessary for the synthesis of DNA, the functioning of the hematopoietic and nervous systems and they play an important role in the metabolism of homocysteine.

Amaranth is not the best source of B vitamins (B2, B1, B3) - it has the smallest amount of these vitamins among all groats.

The exception is vitamin B6, because in 100 grams of cooked porridge we can find as much as 0.113 mg of the mentioned vitamin (slightly less than in quinoa, which contains 0,123 mg / 100 mg).

The estimated daily requirement for this vitamin is 1.3 mg.

Vitamin B6 facilitates the absorption of protein, affects the production of hemoglobin, soothes muscle cramps and strengthens the body's immune system.

Nutritional values in 100 g of amaranth after cooking:

  • 102 kcal;
  • 3.8 g of protein - these are proteins of high nutritional value, containing exogenous amino acids;
  • no data - sugar;
  • 1.58 g fat;
  • 18.69 g carbohydrates.

Amaranth is gluten-free.

Groats are a very good source of manganese.

Amaranth contains the most of this element among all groats, as much as 0.85 mg per 100 g, which is more than 37% of the daily requirement for an adult male and 47% for women, estimated at 2.3 mg and 1.8 mg respectively.

Manganese is a component of many enzymes involved in the digestive process. It affects the proper functioning of the nervous system (in combination with calcium, it can relieve the discomfort associated with PMS), libido, sexual performance and fertility. Manganese is also an essential component of bones.

Amaranth is a very good source of iron.

In 100 grams of this cereal there is 2.1 mg of this element, which is 20% of the daily requirement in men, which is 10 mg and 11% of the daily requirement in women (18 mg).

Iron plays a very important role in tissue respiration processes and in the formation of red blood cells in the bone marrow.

It's a good source of magnesium - contains about 65 mg per 100 g of cooked porridge.

The recommended daily intake of magnesium is 410 mg for men and 310 mg for women.

Magnesium is involved in protein biosynthesis, nerve conduction, muscle contractility and thermoregulation processes. it's also important in the regulation of blood pressure and plays an important role in the mineral homeostasis of the body and bones.

Amaranth contains 150 mg / 100 g of phosphorus, which is about 20% of the daily requirement. Phosphorus participates in the mineralization of bones and teeth. it's necessary for the construction of soft tissues and cell membranes. It plays an important role in the transmission of nerve impulses. It takes part in energy transformations and helps in maintaining acid-base balance.

It's also a good source of copper, 0.19 mg of this element can be found in 100 g of it, which is almost 16% of the daily requirement for an adult human.

Amaranth is also a relatively rich source of zinc. In 100 grams of cooked groats we can find 0.86 mg of this element, which is over 8% of the daily requirement.

Groats do not contain much potassium, but amaranth contains relatively much - 135 mg per 100 g of cooked porridge, which is about 3% of the recommended daily requirement, which is estimated at 4700 mg.

Manganese interacts with antibiotics - it can reduce their bioavailability.

Millet

Often referred to as "queen of groats" - it's easily digestible, abounds in easily digestible protein, it's gluten-free.

It reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, and thanks to the silicon content affects the resistance and appearance of hair, skin and nails.

It has a very favorable ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated, which is 2:1.

Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the growth of "good" cholesterol in the blood, and lower the concentration of "bad", which in turn reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Millet contains as much vitamin B1 (thiamine) as the quinoa - 0.106 mg / 100 g.

This amount represents approximately 10% of the daily requirement for vitamin B1, which is 1.3 mg for men and 1.1 mg for women.

Vitamin B1 supports the work of the heart and the functioning of the circulatory system and influences proper bone growth and development.

Millet is also a good source of vitamin B2 (riboflavin) - 0.082 mg / 100 g.

The daily requirement for riboflavin is estimated at 1.3 mg for men and 1.1 mg for women.

Vitamin B2 affects the proper functioning of the immune system, improves the condition of the skin, hair and nails, and strengthens the eyesight.

Millet also contains other B vitamins (values for 100 g):

  • vitamin B4 - 11.2 mg
  • vitamin B5 - 0,171 mg
  • vitamin B6 - 0.108 mg
  • folates - 19 ug

Nutritional values in 100 grams of millet after cooking:

  • 119 kcal;
  • 3.51 g of protein - these are proteins of high nutritional value, containing exogenous amino acids;
  • 0.13 g sugar;
  • 1 g fat;
  • 23.67 g of carbohydrates.

Gluten-free.

As the only of all groats it contains silicon, which improves the immune system, determines the proper growth and appearance of hair, skin and nails.

100 g of dry millet contains between 0.5 g and 2.8-4.3 g of silicon. The daily demand for silicon has not been established, because the biological importance of silicon for the body is not fully understood. it's assumed that the daily silicon demand may be about 20-30 mg. To prevent osteoporosis it's recommended to eat about 40 mg of silicon a day.

A fiber-rich diet provides more than 40 mg of silicon a day.

Good source of magnesium - 44 mg / 100 g (for comparison buckwheat - 51 mg / 100 g) and phosphorus - 100 mg / 100 g.

Millet is a good source of copper, 100 g of groats contain 0.161 mg of this element, which is almost 18% of the daily requirement.

Copper is essential in the body for the proper functioning of the nervous system. it's also a component of many enzymes involved in oxygen transformation.

Millet is also a good source of zinc. 100 grams of cooked groats contains 0.91 mg of this element (quinoa is the only one that contains more - 1.09 mg / 100 g).

Zinc is an essential ingredient in many enzymes. it's also responsible for maintaining the stability of cell membranes and immune defense of the body.

Millet divides pro-health properties with other whole-grain products - above all, it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by lowering cholesterol and blood pressure.

It's very possible that millet has antifungal properties.

Millet is commonly indicated as a good source of lecithin, which has a positive effect on the functioning of the brain and nervous system, although it's uncertain whether it gives any therapeutic effect. it's worth adding that there are many products that are a better source of lecithin.

Lecithin is a common pigment, e.g. in chicken yolks, soy, liver, beans, wheat germ, sunflower seeds, fish, dairy products, green vegetables, nuts and whole-grain products.

Millet is not mentioned among the products containing the most of it.

In addition, there is no specific daily requirement for lecithin, but it's assumed that we need about 2.5-5 g, and this amount is satisfied by the usual balanced diet and there is no need to supplement it.

We can often find the argument that it's the only one among alkalizing groats, as it does not acidify the body - but it's worth mentioning that food has little effect on acidification of the body.

Buckwheat groats

They’re noteworthy because they don’t cost much, and its properties almost match the ones of quinoa.

It contains a lot of valuable essential amino acids, which facilitate the absorption of calcium, support concentration and positively affect the mood and well-being.

Gluten-free, contains many B vitamins, which have a positive effect on the circulatory system and strengthen immunity. You can find here a rare vitamin K.

It contains exogenous amino acids - lysine, methionine, tryptophan, which the body cannot produce itself. (it's worth mentioning that all groats contain these amino acids, but we can find the most of them in the quinoa and buckwheat.)

Exogenous amino acids play an important role in the process of protein synthesis, they are a coenzyme and a substrate for many chemical reactions (eg tryptophan is a substrate for serotonin, the level of which affects our well-being, among others). They also play the role of a regulator of many chemical reactions and secretion of enzymes.

It's the best source of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) - 0.359 mg / 100 g.

The estimated daily requirement for vitamin B5 is 5 mg.

Vitamin B5 is involved in the synthesis of fatty acids and vitamins A and D. It increases the production of bile and red blood cells. It strengthens the immune system.

The highest amount of vitamin K among all groats is found in buckwheat - 1.9g per 100 grams. In other grits, the amount of vitamin K does not exceed 1 μg. The recommended daily intake of this vitamin is 65 μg for men and 55 μg for women.

Vitamin K is involved in the synthesis and maintenance of the correct concentration of coagulation factors and proteins that build bone tissue. It has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, analgesic and inhibiting properties of certain cancers (including breast, ovary, colon, gallbladder, liver).

A very good source of vitamin B4 (choline) - 20.1 mg / 100 g (for comparison, quinoa contains 23 mg / 100).

Vitamin B4 is responsible for the creation and maintenance of normal cell structure and control of muscle function, respiratory system and cardiac function.

Buckwheat contains, though in a smaller amount, also the remaining B vitamins (in 100 g):

  • vitamin B1 - 0.04 mg;
  • vitamin B2 - 0.04 mg;
  • vitamin B3 - 0.094 mg;
  • vitamin B6 - 0.077 mg;
  • vitamin B9 - 14 μg

Nutritional values in 100 g of buckwheat after cooking:

  • 92 kcal;
  • 3.38 g of protein - these are proteins of high nutritional value, containing exogenous amino acids;
  • 0.9 g g sugar;
  • 0.62 g fat;
  • 19.94 g of carbohydrates.

Gluten-free.

it's worth eating buckwheat groats also due to the magnesium content - 51 mg / 100 g.

The recommended daily intake of magnesium is 410 mg for men and 310 mg for women.

Magnesium is involved in protein biosynthesis, nerve conduction, muscle contractility and thermoregulation processes. it's also important in the regulation of blood pressure and plays an important role in the mineral homeostasis of the body and bones.

A good source of phosphorus - 70 mg / 100 g, which helps maintain the acid-base balance in the body.

Buckwheat contains a relatively large amount of copper - 0.146 g per 100 g. This is 16% of the daily requirement for this element.

it's worth mentioning that copper supports the nervous system and protects against free radicals.

Buckwheat is sold either unroasted or roasted. it's widely believed that unroasted porridge is more valuable - during the curing it loses some of its properties and gains a more intense flavor (unroasted groats are more delicate).

In the specification, we give the values for roasted porridge commonly available in stores. Unroasted groats can more commonly be found on markets.

Barley

Recommended for issues with the digestive system - contains a lot of soluble fiber, prevents constipation. These groats contain gluten.

It contains the most vitamin B3 of all groats, thanks to which it supports the endocrine system and the formation of red blood cells.

Barley groats contain a lot of soluble fiber, which prevents constipation, bloating and abdominal pain. The beta-glucans in it allow you to lower the level of sugar and cholesterol in the blood. Most of them are in pearl barley.

Beta-glucans is a group of organic chemical compounds that form the cell walls of yeasts, fungi and some cereals (oats, barley, wheat) and a component of dietary fiber. Most beta-glucans are insoluble in water, only those present in cereals are soluble.

Beta-glucans can reduce the risk of heart and circulatory diseases. Beta-glucans soluble in water lower blood cholesterol levels, especially in people with high levels of total cholesterol and high levels of "bad cholesterol" LDL. Beta-glucans may also lower blood glucose, but the results are not conclusive. 3 g of beta-glucans contained in barley or oatmeal a day is sufficient enough to observe a decrease in cholesterol. 100 grams of cooked barley groats contain less than 4 grams of dietary fiber.

Of all the groats, the most vitamin B3 (niacin) is found in pearled pearl barley - 2.06 mg / 100 g.

The estimated daily requirement for vitamin B3 is 16 mg for men and 14 mg for women.

Vitamin B3 is involved in the synthesis of many hormones (estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, cortisol, thyroxine and insulin) and in the formation of red platelets.

Barley groats is a very good source of various B vitamins (content in 100 g):

  • vitamin B1 - 0.083 mg;
  • vitamin B2 - 0.06 mg;
  • vitamin B4 (choline) - 13.4 mg
  • vitamin B5 - 0.135 mg;
  • vitamin B6 -115 mg;

Nutritional values in 100 g barley porridge after cooking:

  • 123 kcal;
  • 2.26 g of protein
  • 0.28 g sugar;
  • 0.44 g fat;
  • 28.22 g carbohydrates.

It contains gluten.

Barley groats are a good source of phosphorus (54 mg / 100 g) and magnesium (22 mg / 100 g).

Barley groats contain a relatively large amount of iron - 1.3 mg per 100 g. This is the amount that caters daily demand in 13% in men and in 7% in women.

Iron, apart from its obvious role in the process of tissue respiration, also supports the metabolism of cholesterol and promotes the detoxification of harmful substances in the liver.

Barley groats also contain a lot of zinc - 0.82 mg per 100 g, which is 8% of the daily requirement for this element.

Zinc supports the immune system, supports the functioning of many hormones as well as tastes and smells.

Barley groats contain 8.6 μg of selenium per 100 grams of groats, which covers more than 15% of the daily demand for this element.

We can distinguish different types of barley groats, such as pearl barley or country barley - different degree of fragmentation.

it's worth choosing the least fragmented groats and processed - it contains the most nutritional values (in the pearl barley, whole grain is preserved, devoid of only scales).

Bulgur

Bulgur with vitamin B5 content strengthens the immune system and supports the work of the cardiovascular system.

it's also a valuable source of folic acid and magnesium, the healthiest of wheat groats (containing gluten)

The most vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) is in buckwheat - 0.359 mg / 100 g.

However, bulgur groats don’t contain much less - 0.344 mg / 100 g. The estimated daily requirement for B5 is 5 mg.

Vitamin B5 is involved in the synthesis of fatty acids and vitamins A and D. It increases the production of bile and red blood cells. It strengthens the immune system.

Bulgur grits contain 18 μg folate (vitamin B9).

Folate is a group of compounds that includes folic acid and its derivatives. In the human body they are necessary for the synthesis of DNA, the functioning of the hematopoietic and nervous systems and they play an important role in the metabolism of homocysteine.

We can find a whole range of vitamins from group B in it:

  • vitamin B1 - 0.057 mg;
  • vitamin B2 - 0.028 mg;
  • vitamin B3 - 1.00 mg;
  • vitamin B4 (choline) - 6.9 mg.

Nutritional values in 100 g of bulgur grits after cooking:

  • 83 kcal;
  • 3.08 g of protein;
  • 0.1 g g sugar;
  • 0.24 g fat;
  • 18.58 g carbohydrates.

It contains gluten and is made of wheat.

Bulgur groats also contain a relatively large amount of manganese. In 100 grams of groats there is 0.61 mg of this element, which is 26% of the daily requirement in men and 34% in women.

Barley groats contain respectively 40 mg of phosphorus per 100 g of cooked groats (for comparison, buckwheat contains 70 mg, millet 100 mg, with a daily requirement of 700 mg).

Groats contain relatively much iron, but bulgur is not the best source of it. 0.96 mg per 100 g of cooked porridge satisfies 9% of the demand for this element in men and 5% in women.

Couscous, semolina and maize groats

These groats, although having the least amount of vitamins and nutritional values ​​are especially recommended for children, the elderly, convalescents - they are easily digestible and rarely cause allergies (especially maize).

Couscous groats contain the most selenium of all groats - 27.5g per 100 grams of groats cover 50% of the daily demand for this element. Selenium is involved in cell metabolic processes and is essential for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. It increases the body's resistance and may reduce the risk of some forms of cancer.

In 100 grams of couscous, we can find 0.13 mg of tocopherol alfa (for comparison in 100 grams of buckwheat contains 0.09 mg).

Couscous also contains small amounts of B vitamins:

  • vitamin B1 - 0.063 mg;
  • vitamin B2 - 0.027 mg;
  • vitamin B3 - 0.983 mg;
  • vitamin B6 - 0.051 mg.

Nutritional values ​​in 100 g of couscous porridge after cooking:

  • 112 g kcal;
  • 3.79 g of protein
  • 0.1 g sugar;
  • 0.16 g fat;
  • 23.22 g carbohydrates.

Couscous and semolina contain gluten, while maize is gluten-free

Almost all groats contain a set of 10 essential amino acids in similar amounts, but quinoa and buckwheat clearly contain the most of them all.

Exogenous amino acids are essential amino acids that the body cannot synthesize alone, therefore it must be supplied in food. Exogenous amino acids include 10 amino acids, of which two (arginine and histidine) are considered to be relatively exogenous, that is, they are produced in quantities sufficient for an adult human, but not for the developing organism. Other exogenous amino acids are: phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, valine.

Exogenous amino acids play an important role in the process of protein synthesis, they are a coenzyme and a substrate for many chemical reactions (e.g. tryptophan is a substrate for serotonin, the level of which affects our well-being, among other things). They also play the role of a regulator of many chemical reactions and secretion of enzymes.

The demand for exogenous amino acids is different depending on the amino acid and determined per kilogram of body weight. For example, the need for tryptophan is 4 mg per kilogram of body weight, and the need for leucine is 39 mg per kilogram of body weight. In 100 grams, you can find 52 mg of tryptophan and 261 mg of leucine.
Groats contain mainly vitamins from group B.

Vitamins from group B are soluble in water - for this reason it’s better to cook loose groats instead of pre-packaged ones - as we then pour some of the valuable vitamins out.

After cooking porridge,  we can find the largest amounts of B vitamins in quinoa and millet.

The less processed the better.

Buckwheat is better unroasted - in the curing process it loses some of the vitamins and minerals.

If we decide on barley, a better choice will be pearl barley, which is whole grain (together with whites), instead of broken and polished pearl barley.

Groats contain relatively small amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin (from 50 to 70 μg per 100 g), and the recommended daily intake is 6 mg.

Lutein and zeaxanthin are plant dyes that belong together with vitamin A to the carotenoids group. In the human body they accumulate in the eye, in the retina and the lens. They act as antioxidants and neutralize free radicals, protecting the eye cells and preventing many diseases. They also have the ability to absorb harmful UV radiation, and therefore act as natural "sunglasses."

Groats contain a lot of dietary fiber and slowly decomposing carbohydrates, so they leave you feeling full for a long time.

The amount of fiber per 100 g:

  • Quinoa - 2.8 g
  • Amaranth - 2.1 g
  • Jaglana - 1.3 g
  • Buckwheat - 2.7 g
  • Barley - 3.8 g
  • Bulgur - 4.5 g
  • Couscous - 1.4 g

Groats contain very little sodium, so they are recommended for people with hypertension and heart disease.

In a 100 gram portion of cooked porridge, it's not more than 0.4% of the recommended daily requirement, which is 1500 mg.

About author

Cara Marshall

Cara Marshall

Dietetic or self-called "Kitchen-magician". The only things which I would get on the desert island are Pan and canola frying oil!

Also, I have a Bachelor degree in chemistry, so I like to write about some chemical magic here and there.

Hope that you will stick with my articles, and let me guide you in that strange world of circles and lines!

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2 comments

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  • Dear Cara,
    Thank-You for your information on all I could find about what to eat to help my cholesterol. I am 75 and been researching internet to see what I could find to take to lower my bad and raise my good so I can try and get off Lovastatin drugs that are killing the older people. You supplied me with good info. Appreciate you caring about others enough to take the time to do this with out charging an arm and leg.
    “God Bless you for this.”
    Joanne

    • Hello Joanne! I’m writing in the name of Cara. She would like to thank you for those words.
      She recommended, that at first place you have to focus on diet. Then, you can thing about supplementing good quality of Omega3 (for example EPA-DHA Balance from Jarrow Formulas), Ashwagandha (for example from Apollos Hegemony), and Lecithin (for example Gold-Lecithin from Olimp).
      And of course, whole team wish you all the best!

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